Laurie Kolp /4 Poems/

Black-eyed Buckled Breath

Sooner than
greenish-blue
bamboos your
moonlit eyes

pittance muffs
my mood adjunct—
a junkyard palette
cuff-skewed love.

Found poem using newspaper crossword puzzle clues

Blanching Casual

O, wreck of feeling
icy setback, mystic hush—
swaddle mound of earth
to dotted craft and sour.

O, threadbare hope, dweller of
cashmere touch pixel crush
pink piñata— throw concern
without thinking of farewell.

Found poem using newspaper crossword puzzle clues

First Impression: How to Blow It

cross
(copacetic) conduct— martini extra, curled drop of glass
exploding star even out— red wine, curb, orchestra
fire full a sturdy look—linger— brood—go in search of blue
& pop

Found poem using newspaper crossword puzzle clues

The Overflow

Back when
curved earthen jars
were water holders
paddling through
pewter poor
doorways,
we watched
every breath
skip over
Venice
as if love
stayed.

 

Found poem using newspaper crossword puzzle clues

 


 

Laurie Kolp, author of Upon the Blue Couch and Hello, It’s Your Mother, lives in Southeast Texas. Learn more athttp://lauriekolp.com.

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Ryan Quinn Flanagan /The Dog’s Meow/

The Dog’s Meow

The microphone is unplugged, no matter.
The audience is off currying favour in strange horizons,
the lights turned down for effect:

Do you think they call what you do “low art”
just because you are the bottom stair?

The bottom stair does not answer.

There is much confusion.
It is the dog’s meow all over again.
Fluorescent lamps shimmer in the putrid
jigsaw mind.

What about all you up in the winding nose
bleed universe?,
I raise the mic
as I stumble up the stairs
drunk on wine
in my girlfriend’s brown nylon
stockings.

Is it hard to stay grounded
when you’re the third stair from the top?
I imagine it can’t be easy.

The third stair from the top does not answer.
Nobody is talking.
I fear someone may have gotten to them.
Maybe the mob.

 


Ryan Quinn Flanagan is a Canadian-born author residing in Elliot Lake, Ontario, Canada with his other half and mounds of snow.  His work can be found both in print and online in such places as: Evergreen Review, The New York Quarterly, strange POEtry, Word Riot, In Between Hangovers, Red Fez, and The Oklahoma Review.

 

 

 

Paul Brookes /To Grasp/

To Grasp

hair of the snog
Paddle crevasses of the fog
Handle delights of worlds washbasin
Grapple sights of awful bootlacing.

Darken desperate ways wanton
Harken fenestrated days spoken
Loosen raids out into darkness
Gruesome braids entangle starkness.

Gargle the grimness of the day
Snaffle forgetfulness of yesterday
Hustle the heavenly toast buttered
Sisel roped fitness unfettered

Thimbleful of radiator love
Nimbleful of aviator dove
Hastle hungry heavy heads up
Castle chess players beds up

Delight in eyes of green and gold
Despite the sight of preen and mold
Alight the flight of mean and sold
A kite of might is lean and bold

Tucked behind the ear of a desk
rucked beyond the fear of a whelk
barrage ballooned beneficent bedlam
garaged consumed munificent headroom

Resistance is mobile
Subsistence is virile
Subsidence is active
Defiance is reactive

Pro plus days in delight
Ominous rays indelicate plight
Luminous phase conflagrate
Numinous ways profligate.

Allow broad canopies desperate energy
fall guarded heat intense jack knife
lilt motionless nervous oranges
permeate quietly rampant succumb
tremble under vernal wishes xeme your zest

 


 

Paul Brookes was shop assistant, security guard, postman, admin. assistant, lecturer, poetry performer, with “Rats for Love”, his work included in “Rats for Love: The Book”, Bristol Broadsides, 1990. First chapbook was “The Fabulous Invention Of Barnsley”, Dearne Community Arts, 1993. Read his work on BBC Radio Bristol, had a creative writing workshop for sixth formers broadcast on BBC Radio Five Live. Recently published in Blazevox, Nixes Mate, Live Nude Poems, The Bezine, The Bees Are Dead and others. Forthcoming this summer a chapbook called “The Spermbot Blues” published by OpPRESS, and tentatively in autumn “The Headpoke” illustrated chapbook published by Alien Buddha Press.

Tiana Lavrova /Abcessive Abacai/

Abcessive Abacai

hungry hemorrhoided duodecimal bok cantankerously Alabad
hungry hemorrhoided duodecimal
scone ignoble made of horse carca bistro
hiawathholic paparazzi Kyrsteihan Henrietta salami Batista
hiawathholic paparazzi Kyrsteihan Henrietta salami Batista
hiawathholic paparazzi Kyrsteihan Henrietta salami Batista
chemical Zuma boko-dysentery
elderberry salsa Keanu liveris salsa crusted trainers
biscuit trifectically sweet home moan
intangible Dyson’s lambasting alfalfa catch-wire back bone fat lip tight obtuse to mecca-syntactics
hiawathholic paparazzi Kyrsteihan Henrietta salami Batista
mount zion serafina-esque elderberries silhouettes breeding
grounding dumping serpentine Hillel
chemical Zuma bok-dysentery
mount zion serafina-esque elderberries silhouette breeding
zealomille proof in the: Heraclastes HD porno noona Yoko informatized Althusser
ransacked lighted synesthesia’s
ejaculate grunt gaping uvula vulves
fishhook Liveris “windshield Kilos baby gravy” “Azeri acryllic wimmin”
Jessica ovule
thulydisces zero-sum
the ascetic missionary’s Jessican alfredo
Jessican ovule
womb-men zero-summed
smack-talked thulydisces
thulydisces zero-summed womb-men
zero-sum
mortician Thucydides
hour glassed embanked Alto-Benetaro cogystem horseradish breached dollars Azeriji Hajian poor
grammar illiterate Ogilvy uvula vulves.

 


 

Tiana Lavrova is an avant-garde writer from British Columbia, Canada previously published in magazines such as Rapoetics and A Story in 100 Words. Their interests include digital parts-to-whole philosophical musical instruments; open-source philosophical treatments, and Absolutist self-reliant living.

A. R. Morrill /Dead Turtle/

Dead Turtle

I don’t have anything to say
To a dead turtle.
Really, at first
I didn’t even know it was dead.
The dog just paused
In the water and sniffed,
Then licked and
broke the surface tension
With her questioning pink tongue,
And tried to decide
What that thing was
That bobbed
Limp arms and legs
And lolling head
In the scentless shallows,
Distant as the craters
Of the moon –
Just as inconceivable
To her.

We stood and watched it for a while,
Neither of us truly convinced
That it was dead.
Those regular, jerking movements
Could have been
A seizure —
Or some mild
Turtle confusion.
A concussion, maybe?
Or choking,
What if it were choking?
There wasn’t much to be done
But peer through the netted shards
Of sunlight that exist
Only in transition from one moment to the next
On the surface of the water.

I could have said something,
I suppose,
But nothing
Felt quite right –
And what do you say to a dead turtle,
Anyway?
Sorry for your loss?
I did wonder how
I might get his shell –
And yes, I am a little ashamed
About that initial instinct, but
It glistened green and yellow
In the crystal shallows
Like the ordinary, everyday
magical things
A child happens upon
And simply must have,
Those things that wind up
In tiny pockets and lunch pails
Or tucked hypnotically beneath the bed.

Thank god for turtle flesh
And rot,
Bones that would nearly be
Impossible to separate
From the shell.

I don’t need to talk much
To a dead turtle – still,
What might that shell sound like
Full of air,
Whistlin’ Yellow Submarine
Strapped to the hood of my car?

 


 

A.R. Morrill is a poet and creative nonfiction writer from Seattle, Washington.

Roy White /Invasive/

Invasive

Hormones are to women what water is to plants.
                –Billboard advertising Happy Hormone Cottage

If Hormones are to women
what water is to plants,
then happy is to hormone
what cottage is to cheese,
and a woman needs a fish
like a man needs a bicycle.

The garden at the Happy Hormone Cottage,
started out with analogies in tidy
rows, seedlings ordered from
the Educational Testing Service.
Sometimes a woman would collect a few leaves
to liven up a boring literal salad,
or arrange the blooms  to make a bold centerpiece.
But the cottagers couldn’t resist
feeding them leftover hormones,
and (hormones being to plants what water is
to humans) they grew and grew.
Soon they were crawling up the walls of the cottage, so
you had to fight through them to get out the door;
then they invaded roadside ditches,
crowding out the merely botanical weeds
and taking over the billboard that used to show
acres of oily orange supermodel skin.

In the end, analogies ate away the borders
between everything and everything else.  People
wandered the malls, staring at shelf upon shelf
of similar isosceles triangles
in Regular, Economy, and New Fun size.

 

 

Judith Steele /Banjo and Cello/

Banjo and Cello

Sometimes
Banjo loved her singing
torrents of music, deep rhythms of her seas,
ascent of sunrise notes,  grace of solitude
in monologue.

Sometimes
Cello yearned for laughter
of rollicking strings, pluck and twang of good jokes
on a wooden veranda with a raised glass,
endless summer.

Sometimes
they played together
his monologues, her laughter
for a while.